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  • #31
    Originally posted by Morgus View Post
    The frame explanation really sheds some light on Bob Sanders and his issues. I always thought the amount of muscle he had on his frame looked a bit unnatural. Well, moreso than most NFL players anyway.
    I guess I should add that prior injury always increases the chance of reinjury some amount. In some cases, like Matt Stafford's shoulder, the increased chance is minimal. In some cases, like Thomas Davis' triple operated ACL, that thing may as well be overcooked spaghetti.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Alastair View Post
      I guess I should add that prior injury always increases the chance of reinjury some amount. In some cases, like Matt Stafford's shoulder, the increased chance is minimal. In some cases, like Thomas Davis' triple operated ACL, that thing may as well be overcooked spaghetti.
      The guy really needs to get out while he can still walk.

      Comment


      • #33
        A question that's not directly linked to a player injury. I've heard that they've started to like "manufacture" ligaments to the knees, to replace the ones you have if it's torn. Is it any true? And if it is, how well is it working compared to your normal ligament?


        Vampbro for eternity

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by guru_92 View Post
          A question that's not directly linked to a player injury. I've heard that they've started to like "manufacture" ligaments to the knees, to replace the ones you have if it's torn. Is it any true? And if it is, how well is it working compared to your normal ligament?
          Synthetic ligaments have been around for a while, and were widely used in the 70s. However, long term studies found that they tended to stiffen with age, were more expensive, and had high infection rates. I found something else that said that they don't use synthetics unless an allograft or autograft didn't work in the first surgery. It sounds as though they aren't very accepted in the medical community and only used as an emergency backup.

          Added note for PhoenixRogue - Just stumbled across some info that said the failure rate for an ACL repair is 1 - 8%, while the failure rate of a 2nd repair is close to 13%. Washington University in St. Louis is currently doing a study to find out why 2nd repairs have an elevated failure rate. I would gather from this that the third surgery probably puts your chances around 1 in 5 for another failure.

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          • #35
            This thread is awesome. Amazing information and it is explained beautifully. I would agree that it should be stickied

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            • #36
              Thanks for all the praise guys, I really appreciate it. Strangely enough, this thread helps me out more than you guys. I'm using this thread as a giant review of everything I've learned, practice for explaining injuries to patients, and forcing myself to think big picture about what I would expect for recoveries to injuries in the real world. My information should get much more accurate in the 2nd half of the season as my next internship starts in November and is at a Sports Rehab clinic that works on pro athletes. That should really pound a ton of information into me and give me a better idea of how the pros react to rehab.

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              • #37
                Nice call on Williams being out for the year.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by CrazyCarl View Post
                  Nice call on Williams being out for the year.
                  My Achilles made the same popping sound earlier this year. The weird part was it didn't hurt much at all (until about an hour later). When it happened, my first reaction was that someone had kicked the back of my heel. When I realized that there wasn't an idiot who lined up directly behind me on my route, I figured maybe one of the cleats had broken off of my new shoe. When the cleats were ok, I figured I rolled my ankle. I tried to walk it off, couldn't put any weight on it, so I reached down to the back of my heel. When I didn't feel a tendon and there was just soft squishy flesh I knew I was effed.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Alastair View Post
                    My Achilles made the same popping sound earlier this year. The weird part was it didn't hurt much at all (until about an hour later). When it happened, my first reaction was that someone had kicked the back of my heel. When I realized that there wasn't an idiot who lined up directly behind me on my route, I figured maybe one of the cleats had broken off of my new shoe. When the cleats were ok, I figured I rolled my ankle. I tried to walk it off, couldn't put any weight on it, so I reached down to the back of my heel. When I didn't feel a tendon and there was just soft squishy flesh I knew I was effed.
                    I ruptured my achilles, then I walked to the hospital. lol, kiddng.

                    The bone thing you mentioned earlier, is that just genetic or is it a lifestyle thing as well? I looked and didn't see a whole lot on it. I guess my question is: are big bones or small bones genetic or does your nutrient intake have an effect on that?

                    Edit - And if this isn't stickied, it doesn't matter, I will keep bringing it back to the top of the list. lol
                    Originally posted by Daniel
                    Me and my gun buddies aren't paranoid, but let me tell you about how Hillary's gun squads will come into your home to take away your God-given freedoms and guns, while forcing you to gay marry illegal immigrants and turn your home to Muslim abortion clinics.

                    That's how you sound.
                    lmao

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by SwAg Dynasty View Post
                      The bone thing you mentioned earlier, is that just genetic or is it a lifestyle thing as well? I looked and didn't see a whole lot on it. I guess my question is: are big bones or small bones genetic or does your nutrient intake have an effect on that?
                      Genetics is the primary factor. No matter how much milk you force feed your kid, they aren't going to become BJ Raji sized unless the DNA is there. That being said, there are other factors. One of the laws of medicine is the more weight you bear through your bones, the denser they become. Now this doesn't mean fatties have the best bones around. What this means is if you are weightlifting and being active, your bone density increases along with your muscle size. This is actually one of the primary things (other than lack of money) that really prevents us from doing major space travel, such as a manned missions to Mars. If you are in zero gravity for long periods of time, you will essentially get massive osteoporosis and probably start suffering compression fractures the moment you return to Earth. Bones also grow using calcium, but don't think that you can just eat tons of calcium and grow better bones. Once the body feels that it has too much calcium, it flushes it out of your system via the kidneys. The catch there is if you get too much calcium building up in your kidneys, it leads to stones. One of my friend's dad passed a kidney stone and described it as "taking three days to piss out a shard of glass". I wouldn't recommend it.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Alastair View Post
                        Genetics is the primary factor. No matter how much milk you force feed your kid, they aren't going to become BJ Raji sized unless the DNA is there. That being said, there are other factors. One of the laws of medicine is the more weight you bear through your bones, the denser they become. Now this doesn't mean fatties have the best bones around. What this means is if you are weightlifting and being active, your bone density increases along with your muscle size. This is actually one of the primary things (other than lack of money) that really prevents us from doing major space travel, such as a manned missions to Mars. If you are in zero gravity for long periods of time, you will essentially get massive osteoporosis and probably start suffering compression fractures the moment you return to Earth. Bones also grow using calcium, but don't think that you can just eat tons of calcium and grow better bones. Once the body feels that it has too much calcium, it flushes it out of your system via the kidneys. The catch there is if you get too much calcium building up in your kidneys, it leads to stones. One of my friend's dad passed a kidney stone and described it as "taking three days to piss out a shard of glass". I wouldn't recommend it.
                        The reason I ask is because you said genetics and conditioning play huge roles in being injury prone, specifically bone structure - if you aren't genetically gifted physically (or lacking big bones), does having an insane amount of conditioning balance that out? Or is that speculative on my part?
                        Originally posted by Daniel
                        Me and my gun buddies aren't paranoid, but let me tell you about how Hillary's gun squads will come into your home to take away your God-given freedoms and guns, while forcing you to gay marry illegal immigrants and turn your home to Muslim abortion clinics.

                        That's how you sound.
                        lmao

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Alastair View Post
                          Synthetic ligaments have been around for a while, and were widely used in the 70s. However, long term studies found that they tended to stiffen with age, were more expensive, and had high infection rates. I found something else that said that they don't use synthetics unless an allograft or autograft didn't work in the first surgery. It sounds as though they aren't very accepted in the medical community and only used as an emergency backup.

                          Added note for PhoenixRogue - Just stumbled across some info that said the failure rate for an ACL repair is 1 - 8%, while the failure rate of a 2nd repair is close to 13%. Washington University in St. Louis is currently doing a study to find out why 2nd repairs have an elevated failure rate. I would gather from this that the third surgery probably puts your chances around 1 in 5 for another failure.
                          Thanks for the info. I have some really bad knee problems, so I'm going to see a specialist when I get some more money. So how do you fix a ligament on a normal person? I mean, the NFL players gets the best treatment possible and stuff, but for me is it the same thing? I'm nowhere near being an expert, but I'm pretty confident that it's my Patellar tendon that's bothering me in one knee, and both the outside ligaments (Lateral collateral ligament and Medial collateral ligament) on the other.

                          Are there any kind of exercises that I can do too strengthen those parts of the knee, or at least the muscles around them?


                          Vampbro for eternity

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by SwAg Dynasty View Post
                            The reason I ask is because you said genetics and conditioning play huge roles in being injury prone, specifically bone structure - if you aren't genetically gifted physically (or lacking big bones), does having an insane amount of conditioning balance that out? Or is that speculative on my part?
                            It depends on the level of play. In the NFL, you'll need both the conditioning and the genetics. As I said earlier, I've got a small frame. The biggest I've ever been at 6' was 185lbs when I was in the military, I've been working out quite a bit recently and I'm at 175. Let's say I went on an NFL conditioning program and bulked up to 200-210. I would still likely get injured from my bone structure being slight. I don't know if you've ever seen pro athletes in the flesh close up, but it's pretty mind blowing. I remember seeing Jake Locker not far from my house during his sophomore year. I first saw him from a couple of blocks away and didn't know who it was, but remember thinking "That dude has some of the biggest shoulders I've ever seen." If you read his height and weight, it's about the same as my dad, although my dad wears most of his around his waist. That's what I always pictured when hearing 6'2" 230-240. When you see someone who's that size while being only about 3% body fat, they're huge.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by guru_92 View Post
                              Thanks for the info. I have some really bad knee problems, so I'm going to see a specialist when I get some more money. So how do you fix a ligament on a normal person? I mean, the NFL players gets the best treatment possible and stuff, but for me is it the same thing? I'm nowhere near being an expert, but I'm pretty confident that it's my Patellar tendon that's bothering me in one knee, and both the outside ligaments (Lateral collateral ligament and Medial collateral ligament) on the other.

                              Are there any kind of exercises that I can do too strengthen those parts of the knee, or at least the muscles around them?
                              As far as treatment goes, you'll get very similar treatment to that of a pro, the difference will likely be amount of experience of the surgeon and the rehab intensity. An NFL player will fly to anywhere in the country to see the best surgeon in the field, you'll get whoever is available at your local hospital. Also, due mainly to insurance billing, your rehab will probably be about an hour a day two or three times a week. An NFL player will have a private rehab therapist who will likely see them 5 days a week for several hours a day.

                              As far as your injuries go, see the specialist as soon as you can. I though Sweden had government funded health care reducing the patient's share of the costs considerably. Is that not the case? Without getting to see your injury or work with your leg, I'm very hesitant to prescribe any therapeutic exercise for you. If your knee is still in an acute stage of injury, exercise may make the problems worse before they can get better. I would need a lot more information before I could confidently recommend anything.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by Alastair View Post
                                It depends on the level of play. In the NFL, you'll need both the conditioning and the genetics. As I said earlier, I've got a small frame. The biggest I've ever been at 6' was 185lbs when I was in the military, I've been working out quite a bit recently and I'm at 175. Let's say I went on an NFL conditioning program and bulked up to 200-210. I would still likely get injured from my bone structure being slight. I don't know if you've ever seen pro athletes in the flesh close up, but it's pretty mind blowing. I remember seeing Jake Locker not far from my house during his sophomore year. I first saw him from a couple of blocks away and didn't know who it was, but remember thinking "That dude has some of the biggest shoulders I've ever seen." If you read his height and weight, it's about the same as my dad, although my dad wears most of his around his waist. That's what I always pictured when hearing 6'2" 230-240. When you see someone who's that size while being only about 3% body fat, they're huge.
                                I might just be weird then lol

                                Prior to the age of 15 / 16, I was a useless human-being. I was like 5'8 200 lbs, and not a good 200 either because I didn't care about being healthy or anything. Then when I was almost 16, I kicked it into high-gear with dieting, vitamins, working out, work out supplements, etc. and within 8 months, I was at 5'9 140 at like 4-5% body fat at that point. Neither of my parents gave me great physical genetics, both of my parents are "average" size... So I was wondering if the insane amount of working out I put myself through and still do is the reason why I've never been injured despite playing football and lacrosse since I got into the whole workout thing. Admittedly, I'm not on the NFL level, so I can't really compare myself to what they have dealt with in their careers.
                                Originally posted by Daniel
                                Me and my gun buddies aren't paranoid, but let me tell you about how Hillary's gun squads will come into your home to take away your God-given freedoms and guns, while forcing you to gay marry illegal immigrants and turn your home to Muslim abortion clinics.

                                That's how you sound.
                                lmao

                                Comment

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