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Great McFadden Evaluation

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  • Great McFadden Evaluation

    Matt Waldman from www.fftoday.com wrote this. He also predicted Ahmad Bradshaw would be a sleeper
    Here is his analysis of DMC:

    "Darren McFadden, Arkansas: McFadden might be the most difficult player have evaluated for an RSP. His speed and acceleration are better than all but one back in this class. He also played productively during his career while coming off toe surgery and dealing with bruised ribs. When McFadden can run a play as designed, he can break it open for huge gains because of his elite speed. Although he doesn’t make strong lateral moves, he has the ability to bend a run in a direction while running at a high speed. This is a rare ability, but it is still not as effective against a defense as a runner with sharp changes of direction. The problem is this former QB repeatedly demonstrated noticeable deficiencies that I believe will prevent him from making a consistent impact as an NFL runner: falling backward when making direct contact against first and second level defenders because he runs with poor leverage; the tendency for his legs to go dead upon the initial wrap-up; lacking the ability to
    change direction with a hard plant and cut; impatience with his blockers; and poor ball
    protection techniques. Many people have compared McFadden to Eric Dickerson or Adrian
    Peterson, but the only thing McFadden currently shares with these two backs is his speed.
    McFadden’s power is actually something worth calling into question. I am not skeptical of his
    strength and athleticism. He has plenty of both to be an elite NFL running back. The problem
    is his knowledge of how to use it. Any type of power you generate when it comes to delivering
    or deflecting a blow comes from the legs and hips. Not only do these body parts have to be
    strong, but they also need to be positioned well to transfer energy from your body to your
    target. They explain this in more detail on shows that study the physics of martial arts—for
    example, National Geographic did a special where they hooked up UFC fighters like Randy
    Couture to sensors that measure force and flow of energy throughout the body.
    I know it seems a bit like a jump to apply this to a running back, but its not. Think about a
    runner heading through the line of scrimmage and they are come face to face with a DT, LB,
    or DB greeting them head-on. If the runner’s hips and knees are bent then his shoulders will
    have to be leaning forward so he can explode into the contact. When he makes contact, the
    energy transfers from his legs in the ground, up his hips, and to the point of contact with the
    defender. A great runner has learned through a combination of repetition and intuitive
    assimilation of practice and game situations (natural talent) how to subtly change the angle of
    contact in close quarters and deliver enough of a blow to at least "shed" the tackle, if not just
    knock guy on his butt. This is why a back such as Eddie George who "ran too high" coming out
    of college actually was a good NFL player. He was taller than the average back, but he knew
    how to lower his shoulders and bend his knees and hips so more times than not he exploded
    into contact.
    The same can be said with Eric Dickerson. Most people remember his "upright" running style,
    but if you watch highlights that don't involve him running through creases untouched for 40-
    60 yards and looking like Carl Lewis in pads, you'll see a guy who could get low very quick and
    deliver a blow with his shoulders into contact. Adrian Peterson is capable of the same thing. I
    never once worried about his upright running style. The guy has monstrously great balance.
    When I first thought about comparisons to Peterson vs. McFadden I would watch how
    McFadden would get yanked out of bounds by the arm a hit to the hips, or a horse collar and
    see right away from the standpoint of balance Peterson is uniquely different--he stayed in
    bounds on plays like this all the time (which is what is one of quite a few things special about
    his skills). But this also has to do with hip and leg alignment and good use of his strength.
    17
    When I see McFadden in the hole he gets yanked backwards more than many backs (even
    compared to 6-0, 200-lb Felix Smith) in the hole or knocked down on is butt from head-on hits
    because his knee bend and hip bend is just not there. How can you tell? Look at his shoulders.
    A back like George or Dickerson often ran as if their shoulders were a big hand on a clock
    pointed to the number 2 or at worst between the number 1 and number 2. A back like
    McFadden is somewhere between the 12 and 1 and never quite at 1. It's why when he gets hit
    in the hole he'll fall backwards more than the average NFL-quality prospect. A back like
    Edgerrin James, who is unbelievably good at getting low, often gets closer to the number 3
    position with his shoulder lean as he is still running forward. You can't do this unless your hips
    and knees are bent.
    It is not to say that McFadden never lowered his shoulders, but it was generally done in the
    open field with a significant running start against a defensive back. To his credit, he will break
    some long runs as a situational back because he showed the ability to run the designed
    offensive plays at Arkansas to perfection. Arkansas did a terrific job tailoring an offense
    around McFadden and Felix Jones by forcing defenses to overplay one and get burned by the
    other. SEC defenses have some of the best athletes in the country, especially on defense. But
    these fast athletes are used in highly aggressive defenses and they are susceptible to a
    glorified counter play with play action that will force them out of position when that play fake
    goes to an elite athlete in Jones.
    The problems with McFadden show up when he had a reasonably normal freelance opportunity
    and he didn’t possess the vision or patience to allow these normal alternatives to develop. I’ve
    heard McFadden can catch, but after watching six games over a two-year period, I saw a
    runner who dropped easy passes on a consistent basis. Robert Meachem caught a lot of
    passes in workouts last year with his hands, but struggled as a rookie in game situations.
    Once again, this is why game film is invaluable in telling how a player does when the pads
    come on, the fans are screaming, and the veterans are playing with a speed an intensity
    they’ve never seen before.
    Like Reggie Bush, McFadden will learn that his speed isn’t as much of an advantage in the NFL
    as it is in college football. Speaking of Bush, I was very high on the USC back and still believe
    he has the skills to live up to the hype if he can stay healthy and stop pressing so hard to
    make the big play. In contrast, I think McFadden is more of a project that can develop into a
    franchise back if he corrects some serious deficiencies and works his butt off to do so.
    Unfortunately, he hasn’t shown the maturity off the field and football has come rather easy to
    him. Having kids out of wedlock or some college bar fights doesn’t make him a hardened
    criminal, but I believe the odds are against him to take his work ethic to the level of a
    Ladainian Tomlinson or Peyton Manning. And McFadden needs to work this hard to make the
    jump or he will most likely disappoint. The one way I could see how his evaluation is off base
    is if McFadden’s injuries severely altered his running style and he was generally cruising off his
    incredible speed, but I’m skeptical this is the case. My best overall grade of McFadden
    indicates he clearly has the talent to contribute in the NFL, but needs a lot of work to be the
    primary offensive weapon."
    WalterFootball.com Forum Moderator




    Siena NFL ATS Record(TBD)
    Down LOSING Units Through Week 16

  • #2
    Wow, somebody has some time on there hands. JK
    That's really deep analysis

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    • #3
      WOW! It is a good write up on mcfadden

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      • #4
        you guys like my sig?

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        • #5
          I concur
          Browns fan since 1961.....(semper-fi)

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          • #6
            Personally, I don't think we learned a hell of a lot out of this. I didn't, anyway.

            McFadden is an explosive back with game changing speed and excellent quickness. His hands are questionable, both in protecting the football and in the passing game. If McFadden's hit, he's going down. He looks a lot like Reggie Bush in my opinion. He's always a threat to take it to the house, but if you hit him, he won't put up a fight.
            - Also known as Dan.
            - Also known as the footballclod, where I do my own fantasy football and other football related stuff. -> www.footballclod.wordpress.com

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            • #7
              Yeah I agree with Blaze, he basically told us what we already know! And didnt really provide much of an answer...

              Comment


              • #8
                Well it was meant more for people who think he is the next best thing since sliced bread. It's a great analysis that hits his playing style dead on.
                WalterFootball.com Forum Moderator




                Siena NFL ATS Record(TBD)
                Down LOSING Units Through Week 16

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by vbsiena24 View Post
                  Well it was meant more for people who think he is the next best thing since sliced bread. It's a great analysis that hits his playing style dead on.
                  I have been saying some of these things for a while. In fact unless Dallas can move up with their two picks to get him I think he could be this years Brady Quinn and drop to Dallas at pick 22.
                  He has too many holes in his game to be a top 6 talent and I don’t think any of the other top selecting teams are very high on him either.
                  Browns fan since 1961.....(semper-fi)

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by vbsiena24 View Post
                    Well it was meant more for people who think he is the next best thing since sliced bread. It's a great analysis that hits his playing style dead on.
                    What is the best thing since sliced bread?
                    Forgive me I'm Swedish!

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                    • #11
                      An expression that basically means "something that is great and has no flaws"

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                      • #12
                        It's basically a load of crap because sliced bread wasn't that great

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 49ersfan View Post
                          An expression that basically means "something that is great and has no flaws"
                          Yeah, I know that. But if something is the second greatest thing since sliced bread, something else must be the best thing since sliced bread. And I want to know what that other thing is.
                          Forgive me I'm Swedish!

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                          • #14
                            One question.. who is Felix Smith?
                            Cowboys Mock GM

                            Bring that title back to Big D!

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