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  • Thompson and McCarthy under fire?

    HOT SEAT FOR MCCARTHY, THOMPSON?
    Posted by Mike Florio on August 6, 2008, 9:46 a.m.
    Two months ago, life was good for Packers coach Mike McCarthy and G.M. Ted Thompson. A strong 2007 season, culminating in an NFC title game berth, resulted in new contracts for both of them.

    And with that job security likely came the courage to make 2008 the first Favre-free year in Green Bay. Given that it was inevitable that Favre would someday leave the team, this year was the best year, from the perspective of McCarthy and Thompson, to make it happen. Indeed, the Packers could struggle for two or three years before either man’s job would be in jeopardy.

    But given the manner in which McCarthy and Thompson have mishandled Favre’s attempt to return, some league insiders think that both men could be in danger, if the team tanks in 2008.

    Said one team executive, “I can’t believe how the front office has f–ked up this thing. He is one of the two or three best all time players in franchise history. You can’t treat him like a piece of dirt. I would bet that this is going to end up costing a few people their jobs next January.”

    But what of those new contracts, which include hefty buyouts? Well, if the Packers were willing to pay Brett Favre $20 million not to play football, they’d be willing to pay McCarthy not to coach and Thompson not to, um, generally manage.

    Regardless of whether they’re on the hot seat right now, it’s fairly clear to us that the bungling we’ve seen over the past month has undone a lot of the goodwill that they earned a year ago. And just as the organization now wants to move forward into a new era without Brett Favre, the fact that McCarthy and Thompson are so closely linked to the ugliness that has unfolded could mean that the new era can’t truly start until both of them are gone, too.


    I agree with this accessment wholeheartedly. Thompson and McCarthy have bungled this situation from the begining, alienating fans while being actively involved in spreading openly false statements to the media, to football fans, and more importantly, to Favre.

    Ultimately, I think they've lost all credibility. Instead of being cooperative and showing that as heads of an organization they have class, and care about their players, they chose to play hardball and treat the greatest legend in the history of football like complete dirt. No way this doesn't come back to haunt them both.

    Karma is a bizich.

    --Z
    Last edited by ZN0rseman; 08-06-2008, 01:38 PM.
    sigpic
    WFB Comments on Vikings @ Steelers Game Rigging
    PuppyPuncher:"It sure was nice enough of Roger Goodell to let the refs from Ark-Florida officiate the Vikings-Steelers game"
    NoNonsenseCoach:"As a Steelers fan living in Pittsburgh I can still admit that tripping penalty was a complete ghost call."
    Simonds:"The tripping call was awful, yes, but there were a number of other absurd calls that went against the Vikings, including a DEFENSIVE delay of game penalty against the Vikings only called after a failed attempt to convert a third and 2 by the Steelers. Even the commentators were utterly floored that the refs made that call."
    Wraith36444:"A shady tripping call on Minnesota essentially gave the game to the Steelers. The Vikings were the better team, but it is too hard to beat a decent team and the refs. Oh and Harvin is the man."
    MaineMan:"I have to agree that it was an awful call and that it changed the outcome. Overall a great game by the Vikes and tragic that the well-deserved victory was stolen away like that."
    PaddyPatriot:"I've seen this play and I have to agree, I can't believe they called it tripping"
    Johndoe:"You know the officiating is bad when a Steeler's fan, like myself, thinks it was pretty bad."
    Steelers_Pens_Fan:"I will admit that the whole "tripping" thing probably shouldn't have been a flag."
    ZN0rseman:"It's great to know that good old fashioned pro football game rigging is still alive and well in America."
    Klunker18:"I'm with Z on this one. Definitely one of those games that makes you wonder if the NFL wants certain teams to win."
    TRICKaz"I agree that was a BS call"
    InjuredReserve:"Have yet to hear anyone say it was the right call. Seems as if the Vikings were cheated a bit."
    Eagles4Life:"Coaches just need to be able to challenge penalties"
    EL_Guapo:"The tripping call was bad, the delay of game was stupid Either way, the Vikings showed they are a top team."
    EllijayFalconsFan:"The tripping penalty was rediculous."
    Archon095:"Even as a Steeler fan I agree that the call was bull."
    BroncosCon:"I'm sorry that was a total bull**** call and it changed the outcome of the game. Pittsburgh still won, but it was almost like Denver winning at Cincy."

    Tony Dungy:"The Vikings are just one bad tripping penalty away from being undefeated.
    Jon Gruden:"That was just a bad, bad call. It cost the Vikings an important win at Pittsburgh, and it could really hurt them in the post season."

  • #2
    I have heard that the fans are calling for their heads and even insulting Arron Rodgers for being in the wrong place at the wrong time. This is getting way out of hand for the packers. When the Green Bay fans start insulting players you know someone ****ed up badly. Heads will roll in the end.
    If you like quality gaming, conversation, and crazy antics of Chunder, the live stream of Chunderfluff, live, on Twitch.com. Come join the fun at http://www.twitch.tv/chunderfluff#/w...rce=20121004en

    Kermit The Frog + Miss Piggy = Yoda
    Moral of this story: USE CONDOMS KIDS! NEVER KNOW WHAT WEIRD LITTLE JEDI MIGHT POP OUT IF YOU DON'T!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Joey_Potter View Post
      I have heard that the fans are calling for their heads and even insulting Arron Rodgers for being in the wrong place at the wrong time. This is getting way out of hand for the packers. When the Green Bay fans start insulting players you know someone ****ed up badly. Heads will roll in the end.
      I actually believe they would have been better off shaking hands with him, giving him his outright release when he asked for it, and wishing him well. That would have been far easier for fans to swallow as opposed to the horrifying debacle that this has become. Instead of giving fans a last hurrah in Minnesota where they could all see him play, he's in a far worse and much less prestigious situation in Tampa Bay. Packers fans are furious, Thompson and McCarthy look like bastards and nobody is happy.
      sigpic
      WFB Comments on Vikings @ Steelers Game Rigging
      PuppyPuncher:"It sure was nice enough of Roger Goodell to let the refs from Ark-Florida officiate the Vikings-Steelers game"
      NoNonsenseCoach:"As a Steelers fan living in Pittsburgh I can still admit that tripping penalty was a complete ghost call."
      Simonds:"The tripping call was awful, yes, but there were a number of other absurd calls that went against the Vikings, including a DEFENSIVE delay of game penalty against the Vikings only called after a failed attempt to convert a third and 2 by the Steelers. Even the commentators were utterly floored that the refs made that call."
      Wraith36444:"A shady tripping call on Minnesota essentially gave the game to the Steelers. The Vikings were the better team, but it is too hard to beat a decent team and the refs. Oh and Harvin is the man."
      MaineMan:"I have to agree that it was an awful call and that it changed the outcome. Overall a great game by the Vikes and tragic that the well-deserved victory was stolen away like that."
      PaddyPatriot:"I've seen this play and I have to agree, I can't believe they called it tripping"
      Johndoe:"You know the officiating is bad when a Steeler's fan, like myself, thinks it was pretty bad."
      Steelers_Pens_Fan:"I will admit that the whole "tripping" thing probably shouldn't have been a flag."
      ZN0rseman:"It's great to know that good old fashioned pro football game rigging is still alive and well in America."
      Klunker18:"I'm with Z on this one. Definitely one of those games that makes you wonder if the NFL wants certain teams to win."
      TRICKaz"I agree that was a BS call"
      InjuredReserve:"Have yet to hear anyone say it was the right call. Seems as if the Vikings were cheated a bit."
      Eagles4Life:"Coaches just need to be able to challenge penalties"
      EL_Guapo:"The tripping call was bad, the delay of game was stupid Either way, the Vikings showed they are a top team."
      EllijayFalconsFan:"The tripping penalty was rediculous."
      Archon095:"Even as a Steeler fan I agree that the call was bull."
      BroncosCon:"I'm sorry that was a total bull**** call and it changed the outcome of the game. Pittsburgh still won, but it was almost like Denver winning at Cincy."

      Tony Dungy:"The Vikings are just one bad tripping penalty away from being undefeated.
      Jon Gruden:"That was just a bad, bad call. It cost the Vikings an important win at Pittsburgh, and it could really hurt them in the post season."

      Comment


      • #4
        Meh, they'll forget it a year from now when Green Bay has like a 10-6 season.

        Comment


        • #5
          This situation was totally unfair to McCarthy and Thompson to begin with. That would really suck if they got fired because of it.


          R.I.P. Sean Taylor 1983-2007
          HAIL TO THE REDSKINS!

          Comment


          • #6
            Yeah, I prefer Mike Silver's article on Yahoo Sports.

            He totally nails it:

            Favre to blame for nasty divorce
            By Michael Silver, Yahoo! Sports
            Aug 5, 10:44 pm EDT

            More NFL Videos More From Michael SilverTrippin' Tuesday: Owning up to the fans Aug 5, 2008 Five Favre scenarios Aug 5, 2008

            GREEN BAY, Wis. – Aaron Rodgers dropped back, set his feet and prepared to release a routine slant pass when he heard the squeaky voice from behind the fence. The fourth-year quarterback paused during an individual drill late in the Green Bay Packers’ training camp practice Tuesday afternoon and spied a little boy, maybe 6, among the hundreds of spectators lining the Oneida Street side of Clarke Hinkle Field.

            “We don’t love you,” the kid said. “You suck.”

            Rodgers didn’t respond to the taunt, nor did he acknowledge the pockets of fans chanting “we want Brett” and “bring back Favre” at sporadic points during the practice. But given the way things had played out since a certain legendary quarterback’s dramatic return to Titletown less than 48 hours earlier, there was an obvious message that should have been delivered to the kids – and the people acting like them – going to pieces over the messy divorce between the Packers and Brett Favre.

            The Aaron Rodgers era has begun in Green Bay, and if you don’t like that, you’re taking it out on the wrong quarterback.

            “I know people are emotional, but that’s an interesting way of expressing yourself,” Rodgers told Y! Sports after Tuesday’s practice. “All I know is we have a really good team, and we’re excited to get ready for the season.”

            It’s a season which, it now seems painfully clear, will take place without Favre in a Packers uniform for the first time since 1991. And if you want to know who’s most responsible for that, Packers fans, take a look at that No. 4 jersey in the mirror above your dresser.

            There have been numerous tactical missteps made by Favre and the bosses he publicly suggested are dishonest – general manager Ted Thompson and coach Mike McCarthy – during this month-long saga, and Packers fans have a right to be frustrated at both camps. But if you believe that the quarterback soon will be leaving Green Bay, most likely via trade to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, because those merciless meanies just didn’t want poor ol’ Brett around, you’ve got more than cheese clouding your head.

            As McCarthy stated in his news conference after Tuesday’s practice, and as Favre himself had stated more clearly in his latest woe-is-me interview (this one to ESPN’s Chris Mortensen) earlier that morning, the reason the future Hall of Famer couldn’t come back to the Pack was that he can’t let go of his ill will toward his employers.

            Rodgers, meanwhile, has every right to be bitter about the way things went down since Favre stepped onto the tarmac at Austin Straubel Airport on Sunday night. Yet he’s the one biting his lip and acting like the adult.

            Let’s see it from his perspective: After waiting three years for his shot, and without much warmth or mentoring from the guy he was playing behind, Rodgers finally was told he was The Man after Favre’s tearful retirement news conference in March. Shortly before training camp, a story surfaced that Favre had the itch to return. Favre, via text message, dismissed the report as “just rumors,” which was a lie.

            After floating his desire to come out of retirement, Favre waited for Thompson and McCarthy to embrace him as the reinstalled starter, just as he so often has demanded to be indulged over the latter part of his career. This time, they didn’t respond positively – partly because they didn’t believe he wanted to come back and play, partly because they already had committed to Rodgers and didn’t want to destroy their relationship with a talented quarterback they had spent years grooming, and partly because they were tired of being in a subservient position.

            Favre got more and more resentful, lashing out publicly and privately demanding to be released. The team held firm, insisting that it would only trade him to a team outside its division. To force the issue – and thanks largely to the intervention of commissioner Roger Goodell – Favre secured his reinstatement, flew to Green Bay and, in a shameless bit of showmanship, showed up at Lambeau Field with his wife Deanna to watch the team’s “Family Night” scrimmage from a luxury box.

            In that glorified 11-on-11 drill, with some of the 56,000-plus fans booing him, Rodgers completed just 7 of 20 passes. Afterward, he fielded questions from reporters and learned – from them – that the Packers supposedly had declared an open competition between him and Favre for the starting job.

            Gulp.

            “It was news to me,” Rodgers admitted Tuesday. “All of a sudden people are talking about ‘open competition,’ and I’m wondering what happened.”

            For the next day and a half, Rodgers, like the rest of us, wondered what it all meant when Packers CEO Mark Murphy said the team would welcome Favre back “and turn this situation to our advantage.”

            On Monday night, as Favre was staging meetings with his superiors that dragged on so long that McCarthy had to cancel a quarterbacks meeting, it certainly didn’t seem that things were working to Rodgers’ advantage.

            Nonetheless, publicly and privately, Rodgers did what Favre can’t seem to do these days: He kept his cool.

            “If I was going to get mad, or throw something against the wall, what difference would it have made?” Rodgers asked rhetorically. “All I can do is control the attitude I bring into every day, stay positive and think about leading this football team to the best of my ability.”

            Favre, meanwhile, couldn’t overcome the negativity that apparently has been swirling inside his mind for quite some time. In that lengthy vent session last month to Greta Van Susteren of Fox News, Favre complained that he couldn’t trust Thompson because, among other things, the GM had ignored his pleadings to acquire Randy Moss and hired McCarthy over Steve Mariucci, the one-time Packers assistant and former 49ers and Lions coach with whom the quarterback is extremely close.

            Think about that: Favre was affronted because the Pack’s general manager wouldn’t follow his quarterback’s decree about whom to hire as head coach.

            The Packers hired former White House press secretary Ari Fleischer as a PR consultant, but in truth, Favre is the one more in need of such image management.

            Consider that Favre, in another interview, said he only wanted to play for another NFC North team – in order to play the Packers twice a season. Now that’s loyalty.

            Yet, for all his regrettable posturing, Favre still had the image war won when he stepped off that plane Sunday night and received a hero’s welcome and an invitation to return to the Packers’ roster. At that point, the coach of another NFL team told me, “The game’s over. There’s no way Favre won’t get his job back now. If you don’t start him, how are you going to explain it to all of those fans?”

            If Favre, as some suspected, was preparing to engage the Packers in a game of chicken, be it in an attempt to go where he wanted to go (Minnesota) or to get his old job back, this is what he should have done:

            1. Not attend the scrimmage. (Perhaps he and Deanna could have stayed home and rented a DVD.)

            2. Apologize to McCarthy and Thompson for having called them dishonest and assure his bosses he had overcome his ill feelings and was embracing a return to the organization under any terms.

            3. To prove he totally was on board, show up for practice on Tuesday, wave to the adoring fans, meet with reporters afterward and tell them, “I just want a chance to compete for my job and help this team” – even if he believed the competition was going to be a sham.

            4. Quietly push for a trade or his outright release and wait for the Packers, facing the prospect of a season-long quarterback controversy and a $12 million tab for a player they had hoped would stay retired, to blink first.

            Alas, Favre couldn’t help himself. On Tuesday, while still in discussions with McCarthy about his future, he took a break to call Mortensen and confirm what many of us had suspected all along: Favre, despite another public statement to the contrary (“My intentions have always been to play for Green Bay,” Favre had told the Sun Herald of Gulfport, Miss., before returning on Sunday), was the one who wanted out.

            “The problem is that there’s been a lot of damage done and I can’t forget it,” he told Mortensen. “Stuff has been said, stories planted, that just aren’t true. Can I get over all that? I doubt it. … So they can say they welcome me back, but come on, the way they’ve treated me tells you the truth. They don’t want me back, so let’s move on.”

            Move on is what most of Favre’s teammates were eager to do on Tuesday, even some of the Packers who’ve been most supportive of his return.

            “I think it should end today,” veteran cornerback Charles Woodson said. “We should be talking about the team; instead, we’ve talked about one guy for the last five minutes. This is a situation unique to itself, and it has become its own monster.

            “You’ve got fans out there yelling ‘we want Brett,’ yelling A-Rod this and A-Rod that, Ted Thompson this and Ted that. That’s not looking at the grand scheme of things. It’s not helpful at all. You’ve got fans that are die-hard Brett fans, and they’ve put that above the team.”

            If Favre, by forcing the issue, did the Packers and his successor one favor, it was this: We’ve gotten a small taste of Rodgers’ demeanor under intense pressure, and to the young passer’s credit, he has kept his cool a lot better than the outgoing legend.

            “Aaron Rodgers has done everything right,” McCarthy said during his news conference. Later, the coach talked about his conviction that Rodgers will succeed in his new role.

            “You just have to believe in a number of things,” McCarthy said. “Number one, I think he’s prepared himself for this opportunity. I think he has the tools, physically, mentally, emotionally. I mean, you talk about what he’s been challenged with emotionally of late, this is great (training). Who’s had better training to play in the National Football League than Aaron Rodgers, and I think he’s handled it well.”

            Hopefully, that maturity will start to rub off on Favre – and the fans who can’t find the grace to cope with the fact that their hero willfully abandoned them.
            sigpic

            ------------------------------------------------
            Ray Lewis has suffered enough, Commissioner Paul Tagliabue of the National Football League said in a conference call yesterday in explaining why he did not suspend the All-Pro linebacker who pleaded guilty to obstructing justice in a murder case.

            ''It's the courts who have the primary responsibility in this case,'' Tagliabue said. ''We're not a substitute for the courts.''

            ''The offense was a misdemeanor; he had no problems before that and hadn't violated league policies,'' Tagliabue said of Lewis's guilty plea to a misdemeanor charge of obstructing justice in a deal with Atlanta prosecutors, who dropped murder charges against the Ravens star.

            - NYTimes, July 20, 2000

            Comment


            • #7
              Brett is in the wrong not Thompson and defiantely not McCarthy.


              I agree though. For both sides it is important to sort it out as soon as possible.

              Comment


              • #8
                Victim: McCarthy
                Victim: Favre

                Snickering Bastard: Thompson
                If you like quality gaming, conversation, and crazy antics of Chunder, the live stream of Chunderfluff, live, on Twitch.com. Come join the fun at http://www.twitch.tv/chunderfluff#/w...rce=20121004en

                Kermit The Frog + Miss Piggy = Yoda
                Moral of this story: USE CONDOMS KIDS! NEVER KNOW WHAT WEIRD LITTLE JEDI MIGHT POP OUT IF YOU DON'T!

                Comment


                • #9
                  why is it that all these threads are started by vikings fans?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hot seat? Doubtful. The national media LOVES Favre because he is a STAR. Also, it doesn't help that the Favre-worshipers are very vocal, but a small minority

                    http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=780248
                    Favre has lost face in Wisconsin

                    Poll shows favorable view of QB declining in state

                    By DON WALKER
                    [email protected]


                    Posted: Aug. 5, 2008

                    Sixty percent of Wisconsin residents think Green Bay Packers general manager Ted Thompson and coach Mike McCarthy are more concerned about the long-term future of the franchise than Brett Favre is, a statewide poll released Tuesday shows.

                    That is a startling drop in support for the three-time most valuable player, who is perhaps the Packers’ greatest player ever. Last December, as Favre’s Packers were readying a playoff run that would take them to the NFC Championship Game, 73% of the people in Wisconsin had a favorable view of him and only 7% had an unfavorable view.
                    In September 2004, 75% of those surveyed in Wisconsin had a favorable view of Favre and only 9% had an unfavorable view.
                    But after his tearful news conference in March when he announced that he was retiring, Favre began having second thoughts and indicated an interest in coming back to play even though the team had decided to turn to Aaron Rodgers to play quarterback.
                    The survey was conducted statewide on Sunday and Monday. The survey was being conducted as Favre arrived back in Green Bay after being reinstated by NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell in an effort to end the standoff between the quarterback and the franchise.
                    Survey respondents were asked this question: “Who do you think is most concerned about the long-term future of the Green Bay Packers — Brett Favre and his supporters, or general manager Ted Thompson and his coach, Mike McCarthy?”
                    According to the survey, 60% said Thompson/McCarthy and 16% said Favre. A total of 24% of those surveyed either didn’t know or declined to answer.
                    Support for Thompson and McCarthy was statewide, according to the survey, with the strongest support (75%) coming from the Milwaukee area.
                    In the Green Bay area, Thompson and McCarthy were supported by 71% of the survey respondents, while Favre supporters were at only 15%.
                    The support for management in the ongoing tussle between Favre, who wants to return to play professional football, and the Packers, who want to move on without him, could be reflected in the fact that the Packers are professional football’s only publicly owned franchise. The franchise says 112,015 people own shares in the team.
                    Survey respondents were asked this question in relation to Favre: “Do you have a favorable or unfavorable opinion of him?”
                    For those who had a favorable view of Favre, his strongest support came from Milwaukee’s suburbs (54%) and Waukesha (56%).
                    Favorable views of Favre were weakest in Green Bay (31%). In December, 82% of those surveyed in the Green Bay area had a favorable view of him.
                    The telephone poll surveyed 600 residents who said they were likely voters in the November presidential election.
                    The survey has a margin of error of plus or minus 4 percentage points. For example, for a percentage of 50%, this means that repeated samples would produce results between 46% and 54%, 95 times out of a 100.
                    And now for something completely different

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Also, I mentioned 2005, 2006 & last year. I will bring it up again:

                      2005 & 2006: Favre waffles and waits late to return. One 29INT year and one average.
                      2007: Favre comes back earlier, gets a better connection with WRs and whallah! excellent year by the GB.

                      Film doesn't lie ZN0rseman. Favre had a role for sure, he played great. But many of his TDs were due to PHENOMENAL plays by WRs/Donald Lee.

                      Watch the older, 1990's highlights. The receivers simply caught the ball from a great pass from the legend.
                      http://www.nfl.com/videos?videoId=09000d5d809be0b2

                      I don't understand your crusade against TT & MM ZN0rseman? Are you trying to make the Vikings look good? You're start to look like IVF on TJ (but in the opposite way...)
                      And now for something completely different

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by St_Conroy View Post
                        Brett is in the wrong not Thompson and defiantely not McCarthy.
                        I don't understand how Packers fans can believe a single word that comes out of the mouth of Thompson or McCarthy at this point. They haven't been honest from the begining, and clearly half of everything they've said to this point has been proven false. The only thing Favre did was unretire after deciding he'd rather play football again and that retiring was a mistake. Now some Pack fans are buying the BS that Thompson is selling and throwing Favre under the bus. I don't get that.

                        Originally posted by Joey_Potter View Post
                        Victim: McCarthy
                        Victim: Favre
                        Snickering Bastard: Thompson
                        I would tend to agree with that. Still though, McCarthy has made a number of public statements about the situation, most of which were simply not true. Either he was mislead by Thompson, or he's simply dishonest. Either way, I don't think you can believe anything that either one of them has to say anymore.

                        Originally posted by packman_jon View Post
                        I don't understand your crusade against TT & MM ZN0rseman? Are you trying to make the Vikings look good? You're start to look like IVF on TJ (but in the opposite way...)
                        I'm not on a crusade man, I just read some interesting pieces on Thompson and thought I would share them. I was especially motivated to do so after I realized that most of the stuff coming out of their mouths (directly or indirectly) was later proved to be complete bogus.

                        In short, I don't like being lied to Jon. You shouldn't either.
                        Last edited by ZN0rseman; 08-06-2008, 07:31 PM.
                        sigpic
                        WFB Comments on Vikings @ Steelers Game Rigging
                        PuppyPuncher:"It sure was nice enough of Roger Goodell to let the refs from Ark-Florida officiate the Vikings-Steelers game"
                        NoNonsenseCoach:"As a Steelers fan living in Pittsburgh I can still admit that tripping penalty was a complete ghost call."
                        Simonds:"The tripping call was awful, yes, but there were a number of other absurd calls that went against the Vikings, including a DEFENSIVE delay of game penalty against the Vikings only called after a failed attempt to convert a third and 2 by the Steelers. Even the commentators were utterly floored that the refs made that call."
                        Wraith36444:"A shady tripping call on Minnesota essentially gave the game to the Steelers. The Vikings were the better team, but it is too hard to beat a decent team and the refs. Oh and Harvin is the man."
                        MaineMan:"I have to agree that it was an awful call and that it changed the outcome. Overall a great game by the Vikes and tragic that the well-deserved victory was stolen away like that."
                        PaddyPatriot:"I've seen this play and I have to agree, I can't believe they called it tripping"
                        Johndoe:"You know the officiating is bad when a Steeler's fan, like myself, thinks it was pretty bad."
                        Steelers_Pens_Fan:"I will admit that the whole "tripping" thing probably shouldn't have been a flag."
                        ZN0rseman:"It's great to know that good old fashioned pro football game rigging is still alive and well in America."
                        Klunker18:"I'm with Z on this one. Definitely one of those games that makes you wonder if the NFL wants certain teams to win."
                        TRICKaz"I agree that was a BS call"
                        InjuredReserve:"Have yet to hear anyone say it was the right call. Seems as if the Vikings were cheated a bit."
                        Eagles4Life:"Coaches just need to be able to challenge penalties"
                        EL_Guapo:"The tripping call was bad, the delay of game was stupid Either way, the Vikings showed they are a top team."
                        EllijayFalconsFan:"The tripping penalty was rediculous."
                        Archon095:"Even as a Steeler fan I agree that the call was bull."
                        BroncosCon:"I'm sorry that was a total bull**** call and it changed the outcome of the game. Pittsburgh still won, but it was almost like Denver winning at Cincy."

                        Tony Dungy:"The Vikings are just one bad tripping penalty away from being undefeated.
                        Jon Gruden:"That was just a bad, bad call. It cost the Vikings an important win at Pittsburgh, and it could really hurt them in the post season."

                        Comment

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